Updated 15 June 2006

PUBLICATIONS ON CIGARETTE TOXICITY & REGULATION

 

Health New Zealand’s submission dated October 2004 to the Ministry of Health on the Review of the Smoke-free Environments Regulations 1999. (30 pages) Updated Nov. 2005. HealthNZtoMoH2004updated05.pdf

 

Scope for regulation of cigarette smoke toxicity according to brand differences in toxicant emissions
M Laugesen, J Fowles

This is the first published report comparing the overall toxicity of cigarette brands across countries using risk assessment and intensive machine smoking, and adjusting for smoke nicotine and the mortality distribution between disease groupings. The method provides a relative toxicity score as a rational basis for regulating cigarette emissions across all brands sold. Holiday Extra-mild’s overall estimated identifiable toxicant emission levels would reduce 39%, and its cancer risk by 37%, if this cigarette was required by regulation to have the same emissions as a certain Canadian regular brand, Export A full flavor. Regulation to reduce brand differences in emissions, without employing charcoal filters, would reduce total cancer risk by 13% for Holiday Extra-mild, based on measurable toxicants. Toxicity reduction from adding a charcoal filter would be additional to this result. 

www.nzma.org.nz/journal/118-1213/  

 

Scope for regulation of cigarette smoke toxicity: the case for including charcoal filters
M Laugesen, J Fowles

This is the first published report comparing what charcoal filters can do in a cigarette company laboratory with what they do in a commercial cigarette. Over the last 40 years cigarette company scientists have reported that charcoal can reduce aldehydes and hydrogen cyanide emissions in cigarette smoke by 75%-80%. In two Mild Seven charcoal filter brand variants sold in New Zealand containing minimal charcoal, no such reduction in these emissions was seen.

Reductions seen with the charcoal filters as reported 40 years ago, lowered a brand’s overall identifiable toxicity by over 40%, mainly by reducing toxic gas effects on lungs, heart and blood vessels. Whether overall total brand toxicity is reduced by this much is unknown, as currently unidentified toxicants may not be susceptible to removal by charcoal filters.  Total cancer risk was reducible with more certainty, by at least 5%, or 80 deaths a year. www.nzma.org.nz/journal/118-1213/ (Please note: as of Jan 06: the link for ref 2 no longer worked.

CIGARETTE CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY

2006 with Fowles J. Marlboro UltraSmooth - a potentially reduced exposure cigarette? Tob. Control August 2006. In press.

2005 with Fowles J. Regulation of cigarette smoke toxicity. Editorial. NZMJ 15 April 2005: 118; (1213). http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/118-1213/1400/

2005 with Fowles J. Scope for regulation of cigarette smoke toxicity according to brand differences in published toxicant emissions. NZMJ 15 April 2005; 118; (1213).

2005 with Fowles J. Scope for regulation of cigarette smoke toxicity: the case for including charcoal filters. NZMJ 15 April 2005; 118: (1213).

2004 Laugesen M. Regulatory Review on tobacco products. Submission to Ministry of Health, October, from Health New Zealand Ltd. 30 pp. Updated Nov. 2005. HealthNZtoMoH2004updated05.pdf

2004 Laugesen M, Fraser T. A push to assist smokers or time for a Holiday? Letter. NZ Med J 20 February.

2003 with Duncanson M, Fraser T, McClellan V, Linehan B, Shirley R. Hand rolling cigarette papers as the reference point for regulating fire safety. Tob. Control 12: 406-410.

1996 with Fellows SK, Symons RK. Composition of cigarette tobacco and tobacco products. Report for the Ministry of Health, as part of a contract for scientific services.

 

Copyright Health New Zealand 2005. All rights reserved.